Border Patrol

The Trump administration is doing just about everything it can to slow the flood of undocumented Mexicans and Central Americans coming to the U.S. and claiming asylum. But alleviating our growing border crisis is impossible unless Congress changes our immigration laws.

Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, was right when he said Tuesday during a congressional hearing on border security that there is “absolutely no justification whatsoever for Congress to sit on the sidelines and watch as this crisis continues to unfold.” The emergency on the border is “getting worse and worse as Congress sits on its hands and does absolutely nothing” to help.

The border pandemonium is literally fatal. Since December, six migrants have died while in the custody of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Five were children. This isn’t the fault of the Trump administration’s policies that aim to stanch the stream of illegal immigrants. It’s the result of a border patrol collapsing under the weight of hundreds of thousands of migrants making a dangerous and debilitating journey to the U.S. and needing urgent medical care as soon as they arrive.

In fiscal 2018, border agents apprehended nearly 106,000 “family units,” meaning families that made their way illegally onto U.S. soil and, more often than not, claimed asylum. We’re only halfway through this year, and that number has tripled to more than 316,000.

Why is this happening? It is because everyone south of the border knows that to secure indefinite legal protection to stay in the U.S., they need simply to arrive with children, who by law must not be detained for more than 20 days. When the child is released by border patrol, as it inevitably will be, so too is the person who came with them. That’s why the number of apprehensions of supposed families dwarfs apprehensions of single adults.

News media and Trump’s critics blame administration cruelty for the crisis. They’ve started referring to detention centers as “concentration camps” (see P.xx). But the crisis is caused by our nonsensical asylum laws, which are well intentioned but incapable of dealing with the sort of massive run on the border we’re seeing today. Our laws act as a magnet for illegal immigrants, encouraging migrants to make dangerous journeys with children, across Mexico, and enter our country without documentation.

Asylum claims at the border are rising rapidly. The vast majority of migrants who claim asylum, 90%, pass a first screening. They’re ordered to show up at court on a specified date that, because of a backlog of about a million cases, may be five years later. In that time, they’re allowed to work legally within the U.S. Even so, some 40% don’t show up for their court hearings, having disappeared into the country, perhaps forever.

Kevin McAleenan, acting homeland security secretary, is calling for reform, so the asylum process can no longer be abused by migrants who aren’t really fleeing persecution in their own countries but are simply looking for a better way of life in the biggest economy in the world. That’s the lure of the United States. Congress should raise the bar for who can qualify for asylum, McAleenan argues, and make it much easier to remove people quickly if they don’t meet the standard.

Asylum laws are to provide a safe haven to people who arrive at our door with a well-founded fear of persecution. If you’re genuinely fleeing drug gangs out to kill you and your family in Mexico or Canada, you should be let in. If you are persecuted by Iran and can get a flight to America, this country should grant you asylum and keep you safe.

But our crisis is from South American and Central American migrants fleeing El Salvador or Venezuela and merely passing through Mexico. Most arrivals at our southern border are not Mexicans.

The question is, why didn’t they stop in Mexico? And why should they become this country’s responsibility? There are many good reasons to prefer the U.S. to Mexico — more jobs, more freedom, more welfare — but none of these are remotely valid reasons to grant asylum.

These are simple economic migrants, encouraged by massive loopholes in the law and the fecklessness of a Congress unwilling to doing anything about them. Trump has leaned on Mexico to absorb more of them, and that seems to be working. But for a lasting reform, Congress needs to change the law.

More border security, which Democrats say implausibly that they want, and fewer detained migrants: Shouldn’t everyone jump to these reforms?

The problem is that House Democrats have little political incentive to work with Republicans and the White House on any measure that would reduce the flow of illegal immigrants. Democrats are loath to cooperate with the GOP while they, at the same time, hope to drag Trump down to defeat in the 2020 election. It is certainly true that most Democrats are at best muddled on the immigration question and at worst fully in favor of opening the southern border to anyone who wants to come into the country.

But the party of the Left cannot deny that we have a crisis at the southern border. If Democrats are honest, they’ll admit it’s caused by our asylum laws, and they will help fix them.

A jury declined this week to convict a Christian activist who faced up to 20 years in prison for the crime of providing two badly battered illegal immigrants with food, water, and shelter.

Though I am happy that Scott Warren, 36, is a free man (for now), it should have never come to this. The charges against this humanitarian represent a clear-cut case of the federal government attacking the free exercise of religion, which is guaranteed by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and all in the name of respecting the law.

Warren volunteers for a humanitarian group called No More Deaths, which was founded in 2004 “in the form of a coalition of community and faith groups,” the organization says on its site. Its founders include Catholic Bishop Gerald Frederick Kicanas and Presbyterian minister John Fife.

No More Deaths’ core mission is exactly as it sounds: To “stop the deaths of migrants in the desert.” The group, which follows the Faith-Based Principles for Immigration Reform as its guiding light, seeks only to “end death and suffering in the Mexico–U.S. borderlands through civil initiative: people of conscience working openly and in community to uphold fundamental human rights.”

No More Deaths, which has a small base of operations in Ajo, Ariz., about 35 miles from the border, is known for “leaving water, food, socks, blankets and other supplies in the remote corners of Arizona’s deserts,” the Washington Post reports.

They are not coyotes. They are not human traffickers. They are a coalition of humanitarians, many of whom are people of faith.

The U.S. government sought to imprison one of their volunteers for up to 20 years after federal agents discovered in 2018 that he had given food, beds, water, and shelter to two illegal immigrants. Agents knew this because they put No More Deaths’ building in Ajo under surveillance in 2018, according to court filings.

This is what happened next, according to the Post:

Days before the surveillance began, two migrants — Kristian Perez Villanueva of El Salvador and Jose Sacaria Goday of Honduras — had crossed the border near the Mexican town of Sonoyta, they said in a deposition. They trekked through the desert, arriving at a gas station where a stranger offered to drive them to a better location. Authorities identified the driver as Irineo Mujica, the director of Pueblo Sin Fronteras, a migrant rights group that has organized caravans from Central America to the United States. Mujica was arrested last week in Mexico, in a move that his organization says is an attempt by the Mexican government to appease Trump.

Mujica took them to the Barn, according to court records. There was no one on the premises, but the two men were able to find their way into a bathroom on the site. When Warren discovered them about 40 minutes later, the men said they were cold and tired, requesting food and water, as well as a place to rest, as detailed in court records. Warren provided that aid and, according to defense counsel, never hid the men or encouraged them to make an unlawful entry.

During surveillance of the site, agents observed Warren standing outside the Barn, appearing to provide directions to the migrants, though authorities acknowledge they could not hear what he was saying. Agents approached the building. Warren told them to leave, but they determined that the two migrants who had been conversing with the aid worker were in the country illegally, according to court documents, and proceeded to arrest all three men.

From that, the feds charged Warren with conspiracy “to transport and harbor migrants.”

It should not go unnoticed that federal agents arrested Walker on the same day that No More Deaths released a report criticizing the U.S. Border Patrol for “behaving cruelly and unprofessionally” towards illegal immigrants. The mistrial this week means Warren is a free man. But whether he stays that way depends on whether the U.S. Attorney’s office in Arizona wants Warren to face another trial.

All that aside, can we talk for a moment about how this case was a clear attack on religious freedom? The U.S. Constitution is clear and careful when it says of the First Amendment that [emphasis added]:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Christians are called upon to feed, clothe, and shelter the poor. No good Christian could (in good conscience) turn away two humans in the sorry state that Warren reportedly found the two Honduran migrants. Christians are called on to do exactly as he did.

But by leveling felony charges against him, the federal government basically said: You cannot do what your faith asks of you. By attempting to punish Warren for behaving as a Christian, the feds most certainly attacked his free exercise of religion.

If we want to talk about a culture that is hostile towards Christians, and clear examples of threats against religious freedom, this absurd trial is most surely at the top of the heap.

Migrant children at a shelter in Tapachula, Mexico, on June 8. Photo: pedro pardo/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

Migrant children will be housed at an Army base in Oklahoma, as the government struggles to meet growing demands for shelter amid a sharp rise in immigrants being apprehended at the border.

An estimated 1,400 children will be temporarily housed at Fort Sill, a 150-year-old Army base near Lawton, Okla., about 80 miles southwest of the state capital, the government said.

The Department of Health and Human Services, which is tasked with taking care of children aged 17 and under after they are apprehended by Homeland Security, attributed the need for an additional facility to a “dramatic spike in referrals” of children, an HHS spokesperson said Wednesday.

In the first four months of 2019, 40,891 migrant children were placed in the care of the Office of Refugee Resettlement, according to agency data—a 57% increase over the same period last year. U.S. Customs and Border Protection authorities said last week they had apprehended 132,887 people at the border between official entry points in May, including a record 84,542 traveling in family groups and an additional 11,507 unaccompanied children.

If the rate of apprehensions and referrals continues at that pace, ORR estimates it will care for the largest number of migrant children in its nearly 40-year history. The current record stands at 59,170 children, in 2016.

HHS already operates approximately 168 facilities and programs across 23 states. But a deepening humanitarian crisis on the border is straining federal agencies. Last week, the government said it would cancel a variety of activities for migrant children, including soccer and English classes, as well as legal aid because of budget constraints.

As demand for housing migrant children increased this year, the department has been eyeing other government facilities around the country. The HHS spokesperson said the agency plans to open a site in Carrizo Springs, Texas, as a temporary “emergency influx facility” for children, and is considering an additional temporary shelter for children near the Santa Teresa Land Port of Entry in New Mexico.

Before deciding on a facility at Fort Sill, the HHS looked at two other military bases as potential locations: Fort Benning in Georgia and Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana.

Fort Sill was used as temporary housing for children by the ORR in 2014 as the Obama administration faced an influx of unaccompanied migrant children and families crossing the border. The move faced staunch opposition from Oklahoma Republicans. “Fort Sill is not designed for this purpose, and turning the facility into a longer-term solution for housing these minors is extremely concerning,” Rep. Markwayne Mullin said at the time. “We need to be looking for real solutions, not temporary fixes.”

The temporary shelter was ultimately closed after a drop in the number of children referred to HHS.

During World War II, Fort Sill was a Japanese internment site. The base also held German prisoners of war.

An entrance to Fort Sill near Lawton, Okla. in 2014. Photo: Sue Ogrocki/Associated Press

Write to Talal Ansari at Talal.Ansari@wsj.com

Map of Africa

omersukrugoksu | Getty Images

The border crisis is no longer exclusively a problem of illegal Central American migrants. As word spreads of the collapse of border enforcement, the number of migrants from Africa continues to increase. The threat of bringing in dangerous diseases is higher than ever, yet there are no mandatory and universal screenings, quarantines, or detention before illegal immigrants are released into our communities, often within hours.

According to preliminary weekly data used internally by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and given to CR by a Border Patrol agent who must remain anonymous because he is not authorized to speak to the press, over 550 African migrants were apprehended in Texas in just one week – from May 30 through June 5. The lion’s share were from the Democratic Republic of Congo, the country with the worst Ebola outbreak in the world. Here’s the breakdown:

Angola – 101
Cameroon – 6
Democratic Republic of Congo – 314
Gabon – 1
Niger – 1
Republic of Congo – 130

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), not to be confused with the smaller separate nation of “Republic of Congo,” which is to the immediate west of DRC, is currently experiencing the worst Ebola outbreak ever. As of June 4, according to the World Health Organization, there were a total of 2,025 confirmed and reported cases of Ebola, including 1,357 reported deaths.

In addition to Ebola, the DRC is experiencing 87,000 cases of measles, claiming the lives of 1,500. Angola and Cameroon are also experiencing measles outbreaks, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

Yet local media in San Antonio reported on Friday that hundreds of these African migrants were seen dropped off at bus stations in San Antonio. I confirmed with CBP last week that there is no special screening, extra scrutiny, or quarantine required of those coming from African countries more than from anywhere else.

Overall, a record 20,274 illegal aliens were apprehended in Texas during this seven-day period. That is an annualized pace of over one million just for the state of Texas. Honduras had the highest single-country total, accounting for 38 percent of all illegal immigrants caught in the Lone Star State. Honduras is experiencing a mumps outbreak, and many of the caravans left from San Pedro Sula, a northern Honduran town that had 1,336 reported cases of mumps as of April. As of Monday, Arizona officials confirmed 47 cases of mumps in Pinal County, mainly in ICE facilities, a 10-year high for the state. Dan McLaughlin, the mayor of Uvalde, Texas, confirmed to CR at least two known cases among the illegal immigrants held in the detention facility in his city. According to a recent DHS inspector general report, there is “a high incidence of illness among the staff” in some facilities.



Also, as of May 29, there were 51 confirmed cases of mumps among the general population in Hidalgo County, Texas, the busiest illegal alien smuggling corridor along the Southwest border. The disease has spread to every major city in the county.

Then there is Venezuela. Due to the collapse of the economy and civil society, the country is experiencing outbreaks of all sorts of diseases. The number of migrants is beginning to tick up, with 47 apprehended in Texas the first week of June.

It is simply astounding that hundreds of thousands are coming from the most disease-prone countries under the worst traveling arrangements imaginable and there is no quarantine, as required by law. Acting DHS Secretary Kevin McAleenan finally admitted publicly at yesterday’s Senate Judiciary Committee hearing that CBP is not screening anyone for diseases. “The public health risk—family units are released into our communities with unknown vaccination status and without a standard medical examination for communicable diseases of public health concern, as well as a public health risk of disease outbreak at processing facilities,” McAleenan said in his written testimony.

So why is McAleenan himself not requiring such a process, and if such a process is unfeasible given the numbers, shouldn’t these people be inadmissible rather than being released? Asylum does not trump the medically inadmissible statutes of 8 U.S.C. 1182. In other words, if the criminal smuggling conspiracy is so successful that it results in catastrophic numbers jamming our border, why should that strengthen the claim of the aliens to be released without following medical quarantine rather than strengthen the claim of the American sovereign to keep them out?

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this article was published without hyperlinks to various sources. They have been added.



Author: Daniel Horowitz

Daniel Horowitz is a senior editor of Conservative Review. Follow him on Twitter @RMConservative.

Some U.S. cities are becoming overwhelmed with the number of illegal African migrants arriving from Ebola-stricken countries, with Portland Maine complaining that they are beyond capacity.

Large groups of migrants are arriving from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which has been hit by one of the biggest ebola outbreaks in history, with 2,000 recorded cases in the last 10 months.

Border Patrol officials said that 500 people from African countries had been arrested by Border Patrol’s Del Rio Sector in Texas alone in the six days after May 30.

Hundreds of the migrants are being sent to a city-owned shelter in San Francisco.

According to Interim Assistant City Manager Dr. Colleen Bridger, officials were not informed by Border Patrol that the migrants were on their way.

The migrants are then being transported to other areas of the United States, including Portland, Maine, where officials complained they were incapable of processing any more.

“The plan was 350 of them would travel from San Antonio to Portland. When we reached out to Portland Maine they said, ‘Please don’t send us any more. We’re already stretched way beyond our capacity,” Bridger said. “So we’re working with them [the migrants] now to identify other cities throughout the United States where they can go and begin their asylum seeking process.”

Residents of San Antonio expressed concerns about the arrival of the migrants, some of whom were being housed in a nearby church.

The charity Catholic Charities of San Antonio is helping to fund the transportation of the migrants to other areas of the country.

“We’re looking at roughly $14,000 a week on bus tickets alone,” the group’s spokesperson, Christina Higgs, told KENS 5. “We’ve been asked several times if we’re worried if the money will run out and we are. It’s obviously a finite resource.”

Meanwhile, Dr Michael Ryan, the executive director of the WHO’s health emergencies program, told BBC News that the global spread of deadly diseases is becoming “a new normal” thanks to “large and highly mobile populations”.

INFOWARS EXCLUSIVE: Illegals From Ebola-Stricken Congo Sent Across U.S.

Owen Shroyer and Rob Dew report live from San Antonio, Texas, where hundreds of migrants are being dropped off from South America and Africa.

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Some U.S. cities are becoming overwhelmed with the number of illegal African migrants arriving from Ebola-stricken countries, with Portland Maine complaining that they are beyond capacity.

Large groups of migrants are arriving from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which has been hit by one of the biggest ebola outbreaks in history, with 2,000 recorded cases in the last 10 months.

Border Patrol officials said that 500 people from African countries had been arrested by Border Patrol’s Del Rio Sector in Texas alone in the six days after May 30.

Hundreds of the migrants are being sent to a city-owned shelter in San Francisco.

According to Interim Assistant City Manager Dr. Colleen Bridger, officials were not informed by Border Patrol that the migrants were on their way.

The migrants are then being transported to other areas of the United States, including Portland, Maine, where officials complained they were incapable of processing any more.

“The plan was 350 of them would travel from San Antonio to Portland. When we reached out to Portland Maine they said, ‘Please don’t send us any more. We’re already stretched way beyond our capacity,” Bridger said. “So we’re working with them [the migrants] now to identify other cities throughout the United States where they can go and begin their asylum seeking process.”

Residents of San Antonio expressed concerns about the arrival of the migrants, some of whom were being housed in a nearby church.

The charity Catholic Charities of San Antonio is helping to fund the transportation of the migrants to other areas of the country.

“We’re looking at roughly $14,000 a week on bus tickets alone,” the group’s spokesperson, Christina Higgs, told KENS 5. “We’ve been asked several times if we’re worried if the money will run out and we are. It’s obviously a finite resource.”

Meanwhile, Dr Michael Ryan, the executive director of the WHO’s health emergencies program, told BBC News that the global spread of deadly diseases is becoming “a new normal” thanks to “large and highly mobile populations”.

INFOWARS EXCLUSIVE: Illegals From Ebola-Stricken Congo Sent Across U.S.

Owen Shroyer and Rob Dew report live from San Antonio, Texas, where hundreds of migrants are being dropped off from South America and Africa.

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FILE PHOTO: Unaccompanied minors, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America trying to reach the United States, are escorted by U.S. CBP officers as they have been processed for asylum at the Otay Mesa port of entry in San Diego
FILE PHOTO: Unaccompanied minors, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America trying to reach the United States, are escorted by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers as they have been processed for asylum at the Otay Mesa port of entry in San Diego, California, December 17, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo

June 10, 2019

By Kristina Cooke

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – The Trump administration is again changing the way it vets people who want to sponsor minors who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border alone in an effort to speed up the release of thousands of migrant children currently in U.S. custody.

Under the change, announced to staff on Friday, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which houses unaccompanied migrant children, will no longer require an immigration records check on potential sponsors already backgrounded by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

In May 2018, HHS began routinely sending sponsors’ fingerprints to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to check their records on potential sponsors’ immigration history, which would include any arrests for immigration violations and active deportation orders.

But reconciling the immigration background checks with the FBI records was a time consuming process for HHS staff, and the addition of the immigration checks has “not produced any substantive information,” said Evelyn Stauffer, a spokeswoman for HHS.

She said suspending the use of the immigration background checks could speed up the release of children by at least two or three days. About 13,200 children are in HHS custody, Stauffer said. In May, children spent on average 48 days in HHS shelters before being released to sponsors, she said.

Children who are released to people such as grandparents, adult siblings and cousins – to whom this change applies – tend to stay in custody longer than children released to parents, because of increased vetting requirements. In some cases, they stay in care for months.

HHS will continue to share fingerprints with ICE, who will continue to conduct background checks on potential sponsors, but under Friday’s policy change, HHS caseworkers will no longer review the results, which significantly delayed the process, Stauffer said.

The change comes as HHS says it is struggling to find shelter space to respond to a surge of mostly Central American children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border without a parent or legal guardian. Border agents apprehended 11,507 unaccompanied children in May, the highest monthly number since at least 2010, according to government data.

Unaccompanied children are transferred from border patrol custody to HHS shelters until they can be released to a vetted sponsor, usually a relative.

U.S. President Donald Trump has said unaccompanied minors are taking advantage of “loopholes” in U.S. immigration law and has proposed changing laws and regulations that put restrictions on the length of time and conditions in which children can be detained. He is pushing Mexico to do more to stop the flow of migrants through their country.

In addition to sharing information with immigration authorities, HHS in June 2018 dramatically expanded fingerprinting of sponsors.

The latest policy change, which is effective immediately, is the third time HHS has rolled back aspects of the increased vetting. In December, the agency halted the new requirement all household members be fingerprinted and in March it stopped requiring that all parents be fingerprinted.

Many sponsors of unaccompanied minors, who are usually relatives, are living in the United States without authorization and advocates say some sponsors are now more reluctant to claim children in custody because their information is shared with ICE, which enforces immigration laws.

Stauffer said HHS is opening a 1,600-bed shelter in Carrizo Springs, Texas, as soon as possible and will be announcing other sites shortly. Two military bases are also being assessed, she said.

On Wednesday, HHS said it was suspending educational, legal and recreational programs for migrant kids in custody because of budget constraints.

(Reporting by Kristina Cooke; Editing by Mica Rosenberg and Susan Thomas)

Source: OANN

Medical providers are challenging federal immigration policies that they say treat illegals like criminal felons, including shackling them to beds, or pressuring doctors to release them early for detention or deportation.

“Doctors, who have a moral and ethical obligation and duty to care for patients, are actively being prevented from carrying out the practice of medicine as they’ve been trained to practice it,” Kathryn Hampton of Physicians for Human Rights told The New York Times Monday.

The nonprofit advocacy group released a report detailing “cases in which it said optimal health care was compromised by stepped-up immigration security,” the Times reports.

Officials of U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement declined to discuss the issue, referring the Times instead to written guidelines on how agents are to supervise detained illegals who have been taken to medical centers.

Many of the exploding number of illegals arriving at the southern U.S. border are ill, some critically, or require medical treatment for maladies suffered during the trek from Central America or other countries.

Doctors told the Times that the necessary follow-up care for long-term illegals often does not occur, and that they have been barred from discussing information about critically ill aliens with family members.

In addition, agency vehicles parked near hospital entrances are raising fears in illegals, undermining general immigrant care.

Dr. Patricia Lebensohn, an Arizona family physician, complained that Border Patrol agents are often in aliens’ rooms.

But that only “makes sense if you have a prisoner that’s convicted of murder, but this is a different population, especially the asylum seekers,” she told the Times. “They’re not criminals.”

Source: NewsMax Politics

Medical providers are challenging federal immigration policies that they say treat illegal immigrants like criminal felons, including shackling them to beds, or pressuring doctors to release them early for detention or deportation.

“Doctors, who have a moral and ethical obligation and duty to care for patients, are actively being prevented from carrying out the practice of medicine as they’ve been trained to practice it,” Kathryn Hampton of Physicians for Human Rights told The New York Times Monday.

The nonprofit advocacy group released a report detailing “cases in which it said optimal health care was compromised by stepped-up immigration security,” the Times reports.

Officials of U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement declined to discuss the issue, referring the Times instead to written guidelines on how agents are to supervise detained illegal immigrants who have been taken to medical centers.

Many of the exploding number of illegal immigrants arriving at the southern U.S. border are ill, some critically, or require medical treatment for maladies suffered during the trek from Central America or other countries.

Doctors told the Times that the necessary follow-up care for long-term illegal immigrants often does not occur, and that they have been barred from discussing information about critically ill patients with family members.

In addition, agency vehicles parked near hospital entrances are raising fears in illegal immigrants, undermining general immigrant care.

Dr. Patricia Lebensohn, an Arizona family physician, complained that Border Patrol agents are often in patients’ rooms.

But that only “makes sense if you have a prisoner that’s convicted of murder, but this is a different population, especially the asylum seekers,” she told the Times. “They’re not criminals.”

Source: NewsMax America

With his threatened Mexican tariffs now on the back burner, President Donald Trump was looking to claim victory even as some of his Democratic challengers for the White House criticized him for overselling a deal that mostly ramps up existing efforts.

Trump defended the agreement reached by U.S. and Mexican negotiators to head off the 5% tax on all Mexican goods that Trump had threatened to impose Monday as he tried to pressure the country to do more to stem the flow of Central American migrants across the U.S. southern border.

But on Monday he repeated threats to reinstate the tariff plan if Mexico fails to go through with its promises.

“We have fully signed and documented another very important part of the Immigration and Security deal with Mexico, one that the U.S. has been asking about getting for many years,” he said on Twitter Monday. “It will be revealed in the not too distant future and will need a vote by Mexico’s Legislative body!..

But he added, “We do not anticipate a problem with the vote but, if for any reason the approval is not forthcoming, Tariffs will be reinstated!”

Trump also took a shot at Democrats over the Mexico crisis, tweeting that “with our new deal, Mexico is doing more for the USA on Illegal Immigration than the Democrats.”

His Monday threat followed on the heels of similar pronouncement Sunday.

“There is now going to be great cooperation between Mexico & the USA, something that didn’t exist for decades,” Trump tweeted before spending a second day at his Virginia golf course.

“However,” he added, “if for some unknown reason” that doesn’t happen, “we can always go back to our previous, very profitable, position of Tariffs.” Business leaders and many Republicans had urged Trump against the tariffs, warning they would drive up consumer prices, hinder the economy and compromise the ratification of an updated North American trade deal.

The tweets came amid questions about just how much of the deal — announced with great fanfare Friday — was really new. It included a commitment from Mexico, for instance, to deploy its new National Guard to the country’s southern border with Guatemala. Mexico, however, had already intended to do that before Trump’s latest threat and had made that clear to U.S. officials. Mexican officials have described their commitment as an accelerated deployment.

The U.S. also hailed Mexico’s agreement to embrace the expansion of a program implemented earlier this year under which some asylum-seekers are returned to Mexico as they wait out their cases. But U.S. officials had already been working to expand the program, which has already led to the return of about 10,000 to Mexico, without Mexico’s public embrace.

“The president has completely overblown what he reports to have achieved. These are agreements that Mexico had already made, in some cases months ago,” said Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke, speaking on ABC’s “This Week.” ”They might have accelerated the time table, but by and large the president achieved nothing except to jeopardize the most important trading relationship that the United States of America has.”

Another 2020 candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, chastised Trump for using tariffs as a threat and operating a “trade policy based on tweets.”

“I think what the world is tired of and what I am tired of is a president who consistently goes to war, verbal war with our allies, whether it is Mexico, whether it is Canada,” he said.

But acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan, speaking on “Fox News Sunday” insisted “all of it is new,” including the agreement to dispatch around 6,000 National Guard troops — a move Mexico has described as an “acceleration.”

“This is the first time we’ve heard anything like this kind of number of law enforcement being deployed in Mexico to address migration, not just at the southern border but also on the transportation routes to the northern border and in coordinated patrols in key areas along our southwest border,” he said, adding that “people can disagree with the tactics” but that “Mexico came to the table with real proposals” that will be effective, if implemented.

Trump echoed the same in his tweets, insisting the deal was being misrepresented and demanding more credit from the press.

“We have been trying to get some of these Border Actions for a long time, as have other administrations, but were not able to get them, or get them in full, until our signed agreement with Mexico,” he wrote, claiming that if former President Barack Obama had made the deals he has, “the Corrupt Media would be hailing them as Incredible, & a National Holiday would be immediately declared.”

He also teased the idea that more was agreed to than was announced Friday, saying that “some things” and “one in particular” that had been left out of the release but would be “announced at the appropriate time.”

He could have been referring to discussion about Mexico becoming a “safe third country,” which would make it harder for asylum-seekers who pass through the country to claim refuge in the U.S. The idea, which Mexico has long opposed, was discussed during negotiations. But Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard has said Mexico did not agree to it.

Mexico’s ambassador in Washington nonetheless said her country is committed to working with the U.S. and that discussions will continue.

“We want to continue to work with the U.S. very closely on the different challenges that we have together. And one urgent one at this moment is immigration,” said Martha Barcena. She told CBS’ “Face the Nation” that the countries’ “joint declaration of principles … gives us the base for the road map that we have to follow in the incoming months on immigration and cooperation on asylum issues and development in Central America.”

The U.S., she said, wants to see the number of migrants crossing the border return to levels seen in 2018. U.S. Border Patrol last week announced it had apprehended more than 132,000 people at the border in May, including a record 84,542 adults and children traveling together, straining federal resources and leaving officials struggling to provide basic housing and health care.

Source: NewsMax Politics


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